Header graphic for print
Science, Law & the Environment Emerging Topics in Environmental Law

Tag Archives: Elwha Dam removal

What We Are Reading November 7, 2014: More Election Fallout, Peak Coal in China, and Salmon

Posted in Clean Energy, Emerging Policy, Geeky Science Stuff

This week’s “what we are reading” naturally has an election theme: First, I briefly touched on the threat the Republican takeover of the Senate poses to the President’s Clean Power Plan in my reaction to the elections on Tuesday. This article over at Scientific American (reprinted from Environment & Energy Publishing) goes into much more… Continue Reading

What We Are Reading on Friday, August 29th: Elwha River Dam Removal, Science Advice to Governments, Coal Export Developments, and More

Posted in Emerging Policy, Energy Policy, Geeky Science Stuff, Ocean Acidification, Project Permitting

Here is a quick roundup of what has caught my eye this week. First, the last 30 feet of the Glines Canyon Dam on the Elwha River was removed in a spectacular blast at 4:12 pm on Tuesday. John Gussman, “Return of the River” filmmaker, documented the blast:

Elwha Dam Removal Update, February 2014: What Remains of the Dams?

Posted in Emerging Policy, Endangered/Threatened Species, Geeky Science Stuff, Natural Resources and Environment

It has been a while since my last dam removal update, and there is a lot to report. At the one year mark (September 2012), the lower dam had already been removed. Since that time, the area surrounding the dam has continued to be re-vegetated and the difference between September 2011 and September 2013 is… Continue Reading

Dam Removal Update: Elwha River Restoration Project Hits One-Year Construction Mark

Posted in Endangered/Threatened Species, Energy Policy, Project Permitting, Water Quality

The demolition phase of the removal of two dams on the Elwha River is at the one-year mark, and the progress over the past year–after decades of planning–is stunning. For those of you outside of the Pacific Northwest that haven’t been following this project, it is a big deal. Two dams–built in the early 1900s–are… Continue Reading